ReGeneration 2030's Emil Vincentz on the youth's vision for our future food system

Emil Vincentz started his climate activism as a 12 year old. Today he is in his 20s and a member of Regeneration 2030, a movement led by teenagers and young adults in the Nordic and Baltic Sea Regions focused on making the United Nation’s sustainable development goals a reality. He is also the founder of Symplistic, a company helping private and public organizations implement concrete solutions on environmental sustainability.

At the Nordic COP25 in Stockholm, ReGeneration 2030 will be presenting their views on the future of the food system. Join us as Emil and I discuss what actions ReGeneration 2030 is calling for from policy makers, what it’s like to be a young person advocating for the future today, and ways to champion the next generation.

  • 6:00 An inside look into youth climate activism
  • 18:30 Key issues talked about in Emil’s circle (it might surprise you) 
  • 20:50 Actions for policymakers and vision for the future
  • 32:30 How you should engage youth in your community
  • 38:25 The role of parents and what it means to be a good ancestor 

This episode is part of Taste the Transition, a series of lunch conversations during the COP25 climate negotiations highlighting individuals taking climate action through food. Tell us your vision for the food system on www.nordicfoodtech.io/answer or by using the hashtag #NordicClimateAction

Nordic Food Policy Lab’s Marie Persson on taking climate action through food

The Nordic Food Policy Lab was launched by the 5 prime ministers of the Nordic countries in 2017 to curate and share examples of Nordic food policy for health and sustainability. They do this through global partnerships and dialogues. Their goal is meet the UN Sustainable Development Goals through food policy. They also help other countries in achieving the goals.

In this episode, Marie Persson provides an overview of what is happening within food policy across the Nordics. We also take a look at the COP25 UN climate negotiations from a Nordic angle and what a sustainable, healthy diet looks like.

  • 7:30 Overview of the Nordics strengths and weaknesses when it comes to food & food policy
  • 9:40 Why food is such a tricky political conversation
  • 16:30 Examples of individuals taking climate action through food
  • 20:20 What is needed for policy to encourage sustainable production and consumption
  • 25:35 Why more chefs and behavioral psychologists are needed in politics

This episode is part of Taste the Transition, a series of lunch conversations during the COP25 climate negotiations highlighting individuals taking climate action through food. Tell us your vision for the food system on www.nordicfoodtech.io/answer or by using the hashtag #NordicClimateAction

Too Good To Go’s Mikkel Fog Holm-Nielsen on fighting food waste

Too Good To Go enables consumers to buy food that would otherwise be thrown out at the end of the day. The idea started in Denmark and has quickly spread across Europe with everyone from mom and pop bakeries to big grocery retailers getting on board. Today they’ve saved some 25.5 million meals and opened up a new customer segment for many food businesses. 

In this episode, we speak with Mikkel Fog Holm-Nielsen who runs special projects for Too Good To Go’s management team. Join us as we discuss their ambitious strategy to fight food waste across multiple fronts. By 2020, they aim to work with 75,000 businesses, inspire 50 million people to reduce their household food waste, impact regulation in 5 countries, and have a food waste curriculum in 500 schools.

  • 2:00 How Too Good To Go got started
  • 5:40 Creating a business around food waste
  • 14:10 Vision for the future food system and what’s missing to get there 
  • 17:20 How they are fighting food waste via business, politics, education, and household behavior 
  • 27:30 Company culture and why much of the team from Endomondo, which sold to Under Armour for $85 million, joined Too Good To Go
Posted in: Denmark Restaurants

Amass’s Kim Wejendorp on how they’ve made fine dining sustainable

Amass has been recognized multiple times not only as one of the best restaurants in the world, but also as one of the most sustainable.

For them, a zero waste kitchen has been an incredible creative constraint inspiring major changes to how this fine dining institution cooks, recycles, sources, and operates in their local environment.

Today the restaurant’s food and ingredients are 90% organic. Food waste has been reduced by 75% since they started in 2013 and their annual water consumption is done by 5,200 liters. The restaurant’s facilities also include a garden with 80 varietiels of plants and an aquaponic farming system.

A Native New Zealander, Kim Wejendorp was the Sous Chef at Amass Restaurant in Copenhagen before becoming their head of R&D. In this conversation, we talk about how they undertook the transition to sustainability, the creative process that produces a zero waste kitchen, and what kind of partners and innovations they are looking to partner with.

Posted in: Denmark Public Sector

KBH Madhus’ Pernille Nielsen on how the public sector is going 90% organic

KBH Madhus has a mission is to change society through better meals and they’ve been doing this by helping the kitchens of hospitals, schools, and other public institutions go 90% organic, often on the same budget. So many meals are made in the public sector, that this kind of institutional change has massive impact.  In this episode, we talk about the process KBH Madhus uses as well as how any kitchen – big or small, private or public – can do the same.

Posted in: Denmark Resources

Growth Train Accelerator’s Christiane Paaske-Sørensen on fostering AgTech innovation in rural Denmark

How are Denmark’s rural areas spurring AgTech innovation? Christiane is the head of the Growth Train Accelerator program on Lolland-Falster. This area of Denmark is fascinating not only because it has some of the richest soil in the country, but also because its considered “udkantsdanmark” or outer Denmark – a rural region, which has been struggling to attract growth in competition with big cities. Despite this, Growth Train’s 7-week accelerator program has succeeded in attracting international participants. The program focuses on food processing and solutions that meet the local agricultural community’s needs. Christiane provides insight into the region’s AgTech ecosystem as well as describes the ins & outs of the accelerator program. 

Posted in: Denmark Investors

Coop Crowdfunding’s Nicolai Jæpelt on how a supermarket and its shoppers are supporting early stage food startups

Nicolai Jæpelt is the Project Leader for Coop Crowdfunding. Coop is one of the largest supermarket chains in Denmark and is run as a cooperative with approx. 1.8 million members. The supermarket has created a crowdfunding platform where members can invest in early stage food initiatives they believe in. We cover how to get on Coop’s shelves, why this new pathway is so interesting, and what consumers are investing in. We also chat about how to make a successful food crowdfunding campaign and why the platform has become a trend spotting platform for other purchasers. 

Posted in: Denmark Investors

Maersk FoodTrack’s Peter Jorgensen on how the shipping giant is investing in startups to stop food loss

Peter Jorgensen is a Partner at Maersk Growth, the corporate venture arm of the Maersk Group. He focuses on partnering with and investing in startups addressing inefficiencies in existing supply chains, particularly around fighting food waste. Peter has +22 years of experience in shipping and logistics. We deep dive into Maersk’s investment thesis, what they are looking for, and how they see a future food system that is enabled by digitization.  

Posted in: Denmark Resources

Innovation Center Denmark’s Samuel Scheer on accessing global VC funding and opportunities

Samuel Scheer works at Innovation Center Denmark in Tel Aviv, where they have a focus on accelerating Ag & FoodTech businesses. In this episode, we focus on how Nordic companies can tap foreign VC and ecosystems to grow globally. We especially focus on why the Danish-Israeli connection is so interesting, what we can learn from each other, and how you can make the most of the connections and market opportunities these centers have to offer. 

Posted in: Denmark Resources

CPH Food Space’s Mia Maja Hansson on building infrastructure to help food startups scale

Mia Maja Hansson helped to grow food entrepreneurship by establishing many of the spaces and facilities that Copenhagen food entrepreneurs use to get their businesses off the ground. This includes CPH Food Space, Street Food Around the Lakes, and Kitchen Collective. We discuss what each of these initiatives are as well as how and why they got started. We also dive into the history of food entrepreneurship and gastronomy in Copenhagen including what makes it such an innovative environment.