Posted in: Denmark

Juno the Bakery’s Noah Erhun on the resurgence of heritage grains

Noah Erhun has 8 years of experience working in artisanal bakeries in the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, and today in Denmark where he leads production at Juno The Bakery in Copenhagen. His expertise is in naturally leavened breads and heritage grains. In this episode, Noah takes us on a ride through time and around the world as we explore how heritage grains are making a comeback with the surprising help of Instagram.

  • 1:20 How Noah became a baker
  • 6:30 The resurgence of small craft bakeries
  • 9:00 How industrialization changed the game
  • 14:30 Instagram and the alternative grain economy 
  • 21:40 What you should know about Scandinavia’s heritage grains 

For more conversation, join our community on Instagram and hear more episodes at www.nordicfoodtech.io.

Posted in: Denmark Startups

Dyrehøj Vingaard’s Betina Newberry on why Scandinavia wine production is good business

Climate change is warming the Nordics making it increasingly possible to produce wine commercially. Recently, the New York Times published a front page article exploring the budding scene of wine makers who see the Nordics as the next frontier. My guest is Betina Newberry who was featured in the article and owns Denmark’s largest vineyard, Dyrehøj Vingaard, along with her brother. This episode is full of insights on what it takes to produce wine in the Nordics and how the industry is developing as Betina shares her entrepreneurial journey. 

  • 1:40 How the vineyard started 
  • 5:00 Lessons learned in starting a Danish vineyard
  • 14:50 How climate change is changing the wine scene
  • 18:30 The taste of Nordic wine
  • 24:50 The future of wine making 

For more conversation, join our community on Instagram and hear more episodes at www.nordicfoodtech.io.

Posted in: Denmark Iceland Startups

Wholi Foods’ Malena Sigurgeirsdóttir on why a vegetarian eats insects

Malena Sigurgeirsdóttir is the co-founder of Wholi Foods, which was one of the first European companies to produce products with insect protein. Their portfolio includes snack bites, crisp bread, protein bars, and an insect-based meat alternative, which premiered at Roskilde Festival

In this episode, you’ll hear how insects are tiny, but mighty, able to fight poverty, boost nutrition, reduce pollution, and combat climate change. Malena gives us the inside scoop on how they solved her own health issues and why soon they may not feel like such a novel food.  

  • 4:30 The avocado of insects
  • 5:15 How Wholi Foods was started
  • 12:40 Insects vs beef in taste, sustainability, and nutrition
  • 18:50 Vegans, vegetarians, and flexitarians take on insects
  • 29:10 Why the western world needs insects in their diet

For more conversation, join our community on Instagram and hear more episodes at www.nordicfoodtech.io.

University of Greenland’s Aviaja Lyberth Hauptmann on how the world’s diet revolution is challenging Greenland

For a millennia, the Inuit people have managed to survive off the land of Greenland, an extreme Arctic environment. Assistant Professor Aviaja Lyberth Hauptmann has been conducting a two-year postdoc on the Greenlandic Diet Revolution, which looks at the microbiomes of traditional Greenlandic foods, an almost exclusively animal-based diet.

Aviaja’s work encompasses culture, climate change, nutrition, microbiology, biotech, big industry, and politics. Full of fascinating insights, this conversation will get you thinking about what health really means for humans and the planet and how the two can and can’t be connected. It’s also an important conversation to consider how vulnerable communities fit in to our global climate solutions.

  • 5:20 Overview of diet, traditions, and culture
  • 10:20 Why a plant-based diet is causing problems in Greenland
  • 26:00 Vision for the future food system 
  • 30:30 How Arctic micro-organisms create big business opportunities beyond oil & gas
  • 38:00 Wisdom collected from nature and the Inuits

Join our community on Instagram and find more episodes at www.nordicfoodtech.io. Lastly, Aviaja would love to work with top chefs on how the fascinating and rare fermented foods of Greenland could be used to gain new sorts of taste. If you’re a chef listen in at 35:50 for instructions on how to get in touch!

ReGeneration 2030's Emil Vincentz on the youth's vision for our future food system

Emil Vincentz started his climate activism as a 12 year old. Today he is in his 20s and a member of Regeneration 2030, a movement led by teenagers and young adults in the Nordic and Baltic Sea Regions focused on making the United Nation’s sustainable development goals a reality. He is also the founder of Symplistic, a company helping private and public organizations implement concrete solutions on environmental sustainability.

At the Nordic COP25 in Stockholm, ReGeneration 2030 will be presenting their views on the future of the food system. Join us as Emil and I discuss what actions ReGeneration 2030 is calling for from policy makers, what it’s like to be a young person advocating for the future today, and ways to champion the next generation.

  • 6:00 An inside look into youth climate activism
  • 18:30 Key issues talked about in Emil’s circle (it might surprise you) 
  • 20:50 Actions for policymakers and vision for the future
  • 32:30 How you should engage youth in your community
  • 38:25 The role of parents and what it means to be a good ancestor 

This episode is part of Taste the Transition, a series of lunch conversations during the COP25 climate negotiations highlighting individuals taking climate action through food. Tell us your vision for the food system on www.nordicfoodtech.io/answer or by using the hashtag #NordicClimateAction

Nordic Food Policy Lab’s Marie Persson on taking climate action through food

The Nordic Food Policy Lab was launched by the 5 prime ministers of the Nordic countries in 2017 to curate and share examples of Nordic food policy for health and sustainability. They do this through global partnerships and dialogues. Their goal is meet the UN Sustainable Development Goals through food policy. They also help other countries in achieving the goals.

In this episode, Marie Persson provides an overview of what is happening within food policy across the Nordics. We also take a look at the COP25 UN climate negotiations from a Nordic angle and what a sustainable, healthy diet looks like.

  • 7:30 Overview of the Nordics strengths and weaknesses when it comes to food & food policy
  • 9:40 Why food is such a tricky political conversation
  • 16:30 Examples of individuals taking climate action through food
  • 20:20 What is needed for policy to encourage sustainable production and consumption
  • 25:35 Why more chefs and behavioral psychologists are needed in politics

This episode is part of Taste the Transition, a series of lunch conversations during the COP25 climate negotiations highlighting individuals taking climate action through food. Tell us your vision for the food system on www.nordicfoodtech.io/answer or by using the hashtag #NordicClimateAction

Too Good To Go’s Mikkel Fog Holm-Nielsen on fighting food waste

Too Good To Go enables consumers to buy food that would otherwise be thrown out at the end of the day. The idea started in Denmark and has quickly spread across Europe with everyone from mom and pop bakeries to big grocery retailers getting on board. Today they’ve saved some 25.5 million meals and opened up a new customer segment for many food businesses. 

In this episode, we speak with Mikkel Fog Holm-Nielsen who runs special projects for Too Good To Go’s management team. Join us as we discuss their ambitious strategy to fight food waste across multiple fronts. By 2020, they aim to work with 75,000 businesses, inspire 50 million people to reduce their household food waste, impact regulation in 5 countries, and have a food waste curriculum in 500 schools.

  • 2:00 How Too Good To Go got started
  • 5:40 Creating a business around food waste
  • 14:10 Vision for the future food system and what’s missing to get there 
  • 17:20 How they are fighting food waste via business, politics, education, and household behavior 
  • 27:30 Company culture and why much of the team from Endomondo, which sold to Under Armour for $85 million, joined Too Good To Go
Posted in: Denmark Restaurants

Amass’s Kim Wejendorp on how they’ve made fine dining sustainable

Amass has been recognized multiple times not only as one of the best restaurants in the world, but also as one of the most sustainable.

For them, a zero waste kitchen has been an incredible creative constraint inspiring major changes to how this fine dining institution cooks, recycles, sources, and operates in their local environment.

Today the restaurant’s food and ingredients are 90% organic. Food waste has been reduced by 75% since they started in 2013 and their annual water consumption is done by 5,200 liters. The restaurant’s facilities also include a garden with 80 varietiels of plants and an aquaponic farming system.

A Native New Zealander, Kim Wejendorp was the Sous Chef at Amass Restaurant in Copenhagen before becoming their head of R&D. In this conversation, we talk about how they undertook the transition to sustainability, the creative process that produces a zero waste kitchen, and what kind of partners and innovations they are looking to partner with.

Posted in: Denmark Public Sector

KBH Madhus’ Pernille Nielsen on how the public sector is going 90% organic

KBH Madhus has a mission is to change society through better meals and they’ve been doing this by helping the kitchens of hospitals, schools, and other public institutions go 90% organic, often on the same budget. So many meals are made in the public sector, that this kind of institutional change has massive impact.  In this episode, we talk about the process KBH Madhus uses as well as how any kitchen – big or small, private or public – can do the same.

Posted in: Denmark Resources

Growth Train Accelerator’s Christiane Paaske-Sørensen on fostering AgTech innovation in rural Denmark

How are Denmark’s rural areas spurring AgTech innovation? Christiane is the head of the Growth Train Accelerator program on Lolland-Falster. This area of Denmark is fascinating not only because it has some of the richest soil in the country, but also because its considered “udkantsdanmark” or outer Denmark – a rural region, which has been struggling to attract growth in competition with big cities. Despite this, Growth Train’s 7-week accelerator program has succeeded in attracting international participants. The program focuses on food processing and solutions that meet the local agricultural community’s needs. Christiane provides insight into the region’s AgTech ecosystem as well as describes the ins & outs of the accelerator program.